null
Official issuer of New Zealand stamps & commemorative coins

Māori Language Petition First Day Cover Translation

Māori Language Petition First Day Cover

For most of the 20th century, New Zealand‘s governments discouraged and banned people from speaking openly in the Māori language (te reo Māori). In the 1970s a new wave of activism sought to change the destinies of Māori people, and in 1972 the Māori Language Petition sowed the seeds to revitalise their precious indigenous language. 

$1.70 Fighting for te reo Māori - Champions of tereo Māori the Te Reo Maori Society and Nga Tamatoa gathered more than 30,000 signatures for the Māori Language Petition.  

$3.00 Hana Te Hemara delivers the Petition to Parliament - On 14 September 1972 the Māori Language Petition was presented to Parliament calling for courses in Māori language and culture to be offered in New Zealand schools. 

$3.80 Kohangareo begins, 1982 - The year 1982 saw the beginning of Māori language immersion education for preschool aged children. 

$4.30 Kura kaupapa begins, 1985 - Kura kaupapa Māori, schools that work within a whānau-based Māori philosophy and deliver the curriculum in tereo Māori, began in 1985. 

First day cover designed by David Hakaraia, Wellington, New Zealand 

The 50th anniversary of the presentation of the Māori Language Petition at Parliament is led by Te Whare o te Reo Mauriora with TeMātāwai guiding iwi and Māori initiatives and Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori (Māori Language Commission) leading government initiatives. 

 

Māori Language Petition Miniature Sheet First Day Cover

In 1972 te reo champions calling for the language to be taught in schools presented the Māori Language Petition to Parliament. The petition carried the signatures of more than 30,000 New Zealanders and represented the beginnings of a great revival that continues today. 

As well as marking 50 years since the presentation of the Māori language petition to Parliament, there are several other significant milestones for tereo Māori in 2022. It will be 35 years since tereo became an official language and Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori (Māori Language Commission) began, 50 years since the launch of Māori performing arts festival Matatini and 40 years since the launch of kōhangareo, an early childhood Māori language education and care service. In 2022 we will also see Matariki Day, the first public holiday to acknowledge teao Māori, which the Māori Language Commission began lobbying for more than 20 years ago.  

Miniature sheet and first day cover designed by David Hakaraia, Wellington, New Zealand 

The 50th anniversary of the presentation of the Māori Language Petition at Parliament is led by Te Whare o te Reo Mauriora with TeMātāwai guiding iwi and Māori initiatives and Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori (Māori Language Commission) leading government initiatives.